artlog:

Rubber Sentinels of Broadway 

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AMAAAAZING! I’m so there!

harlemcollective:

harlemcollective:

Harlemite, original member of the Harlem Writer’s Guild and phenomenal woman Dr. Maya Angelou.

Queen. Giant. Boss. Spiritual Mother. Phenomenally Black Woman. 

harlemcollective:

harlemcollective:

Harlemite, original member of the Harlem Writer’s Guild and phenomenal woman Dr. Maya Angelou.

Queen. Giant. Boss. Spiritual Mother. Phenomenally Black Woman. 


How Deisy Toussaint Got Her Nationality Back
This young writer never intended to take on the government. But when the battle came to her door, she became a leading spokesperson for Haitian Migrant rights.

How Deisy Toussaint Got Her Nationality Back

This young writer never intended to take on the government. But when the battle came to her door, she became a leading spokesperson for Haitian Migrant rights.

10 of the Most Influential Black Artists Today

Last week Yams, a collective of 38 mostly black and queer artists, withdrew their piece from the Whitney Biennial in protest of “Donelle Woolford,” an artwork in which a white male artist and Princeton professor creates a fictional black female artist named Donelle Woolford with the help of black actresses. The objection was the final straw in a Biennial that already featured only eight non-fictional black artists out of the 104 represented. As Walter Robinson explained: “the whiteness of the Biennial is its own punishment.”
No exhibition proves this point to be true like “Black Eye,” a Tribeca-based exhibition featuring 26 of the most electric black contemporary artists of the moment. In a dizzying variety of media, from a wide range of perspectives, the represented artists explore the complexities of identity while communicating the importance of real diversity in the art world — as opposed to meeting a respectable quota that repels both guilt and true inclusion… 

10 of the Most Influential Black Artists Today

Last week Yams, a collective of 38 mostly black and queer artists, withdrew their piece from the Whitney Biennial in protest of “Donelle Woolford,” an artwork in which a white male artist and Princeton professor creates a fictional black female artist named Donelle Woolford with the help of black actresses. The objection was the final straw in a Biennial that already featured only eight non-fictional black artists out of the 104 represented. As Walter Robinson explained: “the whiteness of the Biennial is its own punishment.

No exhibition proves this point to be true like “Black Eye,” a Tribeca-based exhibition featuring 26 of the most electric black contemporary artists of the moment. In a dizzying variety of media, from a wide range of perspectives, the represented artists explore the complexities of identity while communicating the importance of real diversity in the art world — as opposed to meeting a respectable quota that repels both guilt and true inclusion… 

bronxdoc:

Arianna is one of the students in our pilot after school program. Watch her talk about her love of photography in the video below. And, make a gift to our Kickstarter to keep our after school program going. Just five days left! bronxdoc.org/kickstarter. #photo4all

I think the gap between the two places is finally closing somewhere in my psyche. It’s becoming more difficult for me to distinguish opposing moods and one place from the other.

unicorniacomegalletas:

La hispaniola desde el espacio.
Hermosa imagen de mi pais.

unicorniacomegalletas:

La hispaniola desde el espacio.

Hermosa imagen de mi pais.

(via yencid)

newyorker:

Forty years ago in Chile, General Augusto Pinochet and his military overthrew President Salvador Allende; today, even after the Chilean transition to democracy and Pinochet’s death, tensions remain. Here’s a look at Jon Lowenstein’s photos in the week leading up to Chile’s 2013 Presidential elections: http://nyr.kr/1fHIWWx

Top: Ana Gonzalez points to her late husband, Manuel Recabarren, in the only surviving picture of the couple with their six children.

Bottom-Left: A gallery of small black-and-white photographs of the disappeared, which hangs on a wall that spans the second and third floors of the Museum of Memory and Human Rights.

Bottom-Right: Ana Gonzalez, pictured in her home in Santiago.

Photographs by Jon Lowenstein.

(Source: newyorker.com, via darksilenceinsuburbia)

At about 9 years old I retaliated against my grandmother and decided I no longer wanted to live in my room. It was a baby’s room with it’s pink walls, minature closet, and stuffed animals hanging from the walls in plastic bags (so they wouldn’t get dirty of course). I wanted a big girl’s room. I wanted mami’s room with a TV and all! She was living in NY and wouldn’t be using it anyways! Mama gave in, with the condition I knew it was a “borrowed” room.

The first order of business was transferring my clothes to my new closet. It was the closest thing to a walk-in closet I had ever seen. I moved mami’s things aside and took the opportunity to snoop around her stuff.  To my surprise I found a few photo albums that I never knew existed. I’d never seen pictures of mami when she was little, mama when she was younger, and little did I know there was a man in her life before papi! These people that I called my relatives had a life. They even had a life before me!

I was scolded for snooping, not allowed to keep them for fear I’d ruin them, and once again they were placed out of reach. With time I forgot about them, moved back to NYC and that was that. When mama passed away, mami couldn’t tell me where the albums where, “I have no idea,” “Ask your aunt,” “It was all a blur.” Everyone was evasive.

But a few weeks ago, when I returned to DR, I asked my aunt for the opportunity to photograph all her photos, and out she came with mama’s old albums. Thank God for the digital revolution. At least now I have digital reproductions of them all.